Kickstarter Stretch Goals "Bullsh*t" According to Monaco Designer - News

By Chris Kerr, January 30, 2013
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Andy Schatz is the designer behind the upcoming indie title Monaco, and in a recent chat with Penny Arcade he had the opportunity to discuss the Kickstarter phenomenon.  When speaking to Penny Arcade Schatz revealed that he has "a little bit of an unpopular opinion of Kickstarter,” he then went on to say "I'm really glad for the people that have been really successful on Kickstarter, and don’t get me wrong, I really like the idea of free money, but I’m of the opinion that designing a game around a variable budget is a terrible way to design a game. To be frank, I think that stretch goals are total bullshit.”

When you make statements like that, you'd better have something to back it up with and thankfully Schatz makes quite a compelling case. He explains that:

"If you are adding in some optional thing to incentivize people to give you money… there’s a difference between allowing your fans to have an extreme amount of input on the game, which I do, the beta testers have an incredible influence on the game, but letting them design the game in the sense of ‘if the budget is this, then I’ll do this, and if the budget is that, then I’ll do that,’ that to me sounds like the perfect way to make a game that’s insufficiently complete or bloated.”

Do you agree with what Schatz has to say? Would you like to see Kickstarter goals locked in once they've reached their intended target - thus allowing developers to realise their original design? Or do  think that more investment and as a result more features can only help games improve and potentially reach a wider audience?

Voice those opinions in the comments section below. 

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