Ten Facts about the Videogame Industry - Article

By Stephanie Kopf, April 12, 2012
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1. Long gone are the days when playing videogames meant staying in one place. According to iPhone statistics, a survey by Nielsen on the household penetration of gaming devices in the US in 2012 did show that the PC led by 54%. But the iPhone showed a not at all bad 22%. This number will probably climb in years to come.


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2. Based on an Ericsson survey, the top three times of day for using games on smartphones in the United States in 2011 were late evening – 28%, lunch – 23%, and in bed – 20%.

3. The estimated time spent playing videogames in the United States in 2011, according to a survey by Veronis Suhler Stevenson, was 131 hours per person in total. The number is expected to be 142 by 2012, which is almost double the amount from 2002.

4. Among which age group are videogames most popular? In 2011, 18 to 49-year-olds made up the largest age group at 53%. But people aged 50 and older followed at 29%. The smallest group was under 18 years old, at 18%. Is it because all the kids are on Facebook these days?

5. The total revenue of the U.S. videogame industry amounted to almost four billion dollars in December 2011, according to the NPD Group. November and December usually demonstrate high numbers in terms of videogame sales, as most people are Christmas shopping.

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6. Total revenue of the videogame industry in 2014 is expected to be 30.5 billion dollars, according to Der Aktionär.

7. In 2011 the US led with the number of active videogame players at 145 million, based on a survey by Newzoo. Russia followed with 38 million, Germany with 36 million.

8. A recent survey by Common Sense Media stated that 48% of children have never played videogames, 13% play them several times a week. Only 5% play several times a day.

9. More than half of videogamers in the US use online social platforms to play videogames.

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10. A survey by the Information Solutions Group depicts the gender split of social gamers in the United States in 2011. More men than women were hardcore players, with 55% against 45%. And more women were casual players, with 61% against 39%.

Stephanie Kopf writes for the blog Trenditionist.

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